Last edited by Brami
Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

2 edition of navigation of the Great Ouse between St. Ives and Bedford in the seventeenth century. found in the catalog.

navigation of the Great Ouse between St. Ives and Bedford in the seventeenth century.

Thomas Stuart Willan

navigation of the Great Ouse between St. Ives and Bedford in the seventeenth century.

by Thomas Stuart Willan

  • 280 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published in Streatley .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Inland navigation -- Great Britain.

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesBedfordshire Historical Record Society. Publications -- v. 24, Publications of the Bedfordshire Historical Record Society -- v. 24.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination153 p.
    Number of Pages153
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22409755M

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    The Navigation of the Great Ouse between St. Ives and Bedford in the Seventeenth Century by T. S. Willan. The Navigation of the Great Ouse between St. Ives and Bedford in the Seventeenth Century by T. S. Willan (p. Download PDF Cite this Item xml. The Letter-Book of John, Viscount Mordaunt, by.   A 17 mile riverside walk along the Ouse Valley Way between Bedford and St Neots. Despite the increasing urbanisation between Bedord and St Neots, the riverside sections of this walk provide some pleasant rambles. Particularly notable is the 15th century river bridge at Great Barford and the riverside parks at St Neots.

      The Eau Brink Act created Drainage Commissioners and Navigation Commissioners, who had powers over the river to St Ives, but both bodies were subject to the Bedford Levels Corporation. Although often in opposition, the two parties worked together on the construction of a new lock and staunch at Brownshill, to improve navigation above Earith. Although the second smallest county in England, seventeenth-century Huntingdonshire contained three distinct agricultural economies: cattle fattening on the fens in the east; corn and sheep farming on the heavy clay uplands in the north and west; and a mixture of the two in the Ouse valley in the south.


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Navigation of the Great Ouse between St. Ives and Bedford in the seventeenth century by Thomas Stuart Willan Download PDF EPUB FB2

The navigation of the Great Ouse between St Ives and Bedford in the seventeenth century, edited by T. Willan. Streatley, BHRS, p. illus.

BHRS vol. Out of print. Navigation of the Great Ouse between St. Ives and Bedford in the seventeenth century. Streatley, near Luton, Beds., The Society, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Thomas Stuart Willan. The Ouse above Earith, up to Bedford.

The Great Ouse above Earith, connected to Lynn by the New Bedford River, remained tidal and vessels did not have to pass the sluices at Denver and Hermitage.

We have no direct evidence regarding the volume of traffic on the river at St Ives, Huntingdon, St Neots and by: 5. The Great Ouse by D. Summers [book ] and the excellent History of the Navigation of the Great Ouse between Bedford and St.

Ives [], containing many. Until this time the River Great Ouse was navigable from The Wash at Lynn to Huntingdon but there was growing pressure to continue the navigable route to r and Girton teamed up and together they built 6 sluices above Earith, between St.

Ives and St. Neots, but Bedford was still a. Bedford Town Bridge. Bedford Town Bridge signals the start of Bedford’s iconic embankment with its stone blocks and impressive features. It is pedestrian and road traffic now and sits at the bottom of the High Street on St Paul’s Square.

Bedford was originally built on a ford through the River Great Ouse which developed into a wooden structure. A seventeenth century doctor and his patients: John Symcotts. The minute book of Bedford corporation, Volume The navigation of the Great Ouse between St Ives and Bedford in the seventeenth century.

edited by T. Willan () Volume The Publications of the Bedfordshire Historical Record Society, vol. Ouse between St. Ives and Great Barford. 4 These bills exist at the Bedford County Record Office, for drawing my attention to them. A selection of the MSS dealing with the navigation of the Great Ouse in the seventeenth century is shortly to be published by the Bedfordshire Historical Record Society.

The flow in the Great Ouse is maintained for navigation, fisheries and aesthetic reasons but when there is excessive flow, the excess is diverted along the Bedford Rivers of which there are two, the Old and the New. Between them lies the Ouse Washes.

St Ives Bridge is a 15th-century bridge crossing the River Great Ouse in St Ives, Cambridgeshire, is noted for being one of only four bridges in England to incorporate a chapel (the others being at Rotherham, Wakefield, and Bradford-on-Avon).

The Navigation of the Great Ouse between St Ives and Bedford in the Seventeenth Century, Publications of the Bedfordshire Historical Record Society, 24 () Miscellanea, Publications of the Bedfordshire Historical Record Society, 25 () Parsloe, G.

ed., The Minute Book of Bedford Corporation,Publications of the. The usual range of the River Great Ouse at St Ives is between m and m. It has been between these levels for 90% of the time since monitoring began.

The typical recent level of the River Great Ouse at St Ives over the past 12 months has been between m and m. It has been between these levels for at least days in the past year.

The navigation of the Great Ouse between St Ives and Bedford in the seventeenth century. edited by T. Willan () () Volume The minute book of Bedford corporation, edited by Guy Parsloe () Volume The life and letters of Sir Lewis Dyve edited by H.

Tibbutt () A seventeenth century. Coordinates. The Middle Level Navigations are a network of waterways in England, primarily used for land drainage, which lie in The Fens between the Rivers Nene and Great Ouse, and between the cities of Peterborough and of the area through which they run is at or below sea level, and attempts to protect it from inundation have been carried out since Built on the banks of the wide River Great Ouse between Huntingdon and Ely, St Ives has a famous chapel on its bridge.

In the Anglo-Saxon era, St Ives's position on the Great Ouse was strategic, as it controlled the last natural crossing point or ford on the river, 80 kilometres (50 mi) from the sea. The flint reef in the bed of the river at.

Summers, The Great Ouse; T.S. Willan, The navigation of the Great Ouse between St Ives and Bedford in the seventeenth century, Publications of the Bedfordshire Historical Society 24 ().

The navigation of the Great Ouse between St Ives and Bedford in the seventeenth century. edited by T. Willan () Volume The Publications of the Bedfordshire Historical Record Society, vol.

18 () Volume The Publications of the Bedfordshire Historical Record Society, vol. The Eau Brink Act created Drainage Commissioners and Navigation Commissioners, who had powers over the river to St Ives, but both bodies were subject to the Bedford Levels Corporation.

Although often in opposition, the two parties worked together on the construction of a new lock and staunch at Brownshill, to improve navigation above Earith. You can take a train from St Ives to Bedford via St Erth, London Paddington, Paddington, King's Cross St.

Pancras station, and London St Pancras International in around 7h 18m. Alternatively, you can take a bus from St Ives to Bedford via Penzance, HEATHROW Airport London T2,3, Luton, and Luton Town Centre, Galaxy Centre in around 14h 21m. His River Navigation in England (), followed in by a study of the coastwise trade round England's shores, have remained the starting point for work in the field and both have.

Volume The navigation of the Great Ouse between St Ives and Bedford in the seventeenth century; Volume The Publications of the Bedfordshire Historical Record Society, vol. 25 ; Volume The minute book of Bedford corporation, ; Volume The life and letters of .Built on the banks of the wide River Great Ouse between Huntingdon and Ely, St Ives has a famous chapel on its bridge.

In the Anglo-Saxon era, St Ives’s position on the river Great Ouse was strategic, as it controlled the last natural crossing point or ford on the river, 80 kilometres (50 mi) from the sea.Mr Dingley Askham, owners of freehold land, were present on occasions.® Another difference between members of the manorial jury and 1.

(). Navigation of the Great Ouse between St Ives and Bedford in the seventeenth century". ().